How Men Can Ask For Help
Posted September 19, 2014

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More men believe their primary duty is to financially provide for the family than do women. Are you putting undue stress on yourself? Can you share the emotional load more at home?

A recent study by Insights in Marketing asked a representative sample of U.S. men and women how much they agreed with the statement: “A man’s primary duty is to financially provide for his family.”  Fifty-seven percent of men agreed with the statement compared to 41% of women. Wow! Is it true? The women in our lives might cut us more slack than we do ourselves?

The thought of shifting careers, not climbing the corporate ladder, or not feeling you have the skills needed to be successful in a new role can be debilitating and stress-inducing. Asking for help often isn’t in our toolbox. Admitting fear to a wife isn’t either. Being at the top of the pyramid in a corporation – or the owner of a business – doesn’t provide for a lot of “safe” conversations about how to confront fears or challenges.

So, what can be done? It starts with a willingness to ask for help. Seek out the resources around you: services from your company, self-help books, exercise, mindfulness/meditation, and of course life and executive coaching.

A coach is that objective, non-judgmental partner that listens, helps you uncover the blocks that are holding you back, and calls bulls&%$* when necessary. They will help you develop a plan, hold you accountable to get it done, and be your biggest supporter along the way.

More highly conscious men are better leaders, dads, husbands and partners, but it’s awfully tough to do it alone with a rugged individualist mentality.  Societal expectations are shifting. It’s OK to not try to go-it-alone.

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